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Multiple Sclerosis beaten with nutrition

July 31, 2019

If you have MS, our protocol may help you regain your strength.
US medical academic, Dr Terry Wahls, was diagnosed with MS at age 45. Determined to restore her quality of life, the researcher started experimenting evidence-based diet changes on her own body.
By  Dr Terry Wahls
In the year 2000, I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). I was 45 years old.

When I was diagnosed, my [main] problems were weakness in my left leg and I was stumbling. I also had a history of diminished vision, abnormal spinal fluid and spinal chord lesions.

Over the next three years after my diagnosis, my health continued to decline and eventually I was refined to a wheelchair.

I couldn’t even sit in a regular chair for more than 10 minutes because I was so weak. I had brain fog, severe fatigue and it was very hard to walk even a very short distance.

I wanted to treat my disease with drug therapy. Despite taking the newest drug therapies available, by 2007 I was at my worst. I couldn’t even sit in a regular chair for more than 10 minutes because I was so weak. I had brain fog, severe fatigue and it was very hard to walk even a very short distance.

It was around that same time, over 10 years ago, that I stared reading the basic science about nutrition and MS, and I began experimenting [with methods of MS management] on myself.

I knew that MS is this complicated interaction of genes from your parents and a lifetime of diet and physical activity choices (environmental choices). I also knew that your health is also a reflection of the types of microbes growing in our gut, and that your gut microbiome helped to determine if you got an autoimmune problem (and how severe it would be).

So I looked at the science available and asked ‘what does the science say about vitamins, minerals, fats, proteins and antioxidants my brain needs to properly function?’

[I learned that] when we eat more sugar, processed foods and white flour-based foods, we are more likely to have a mix of bacteria associated with worse health. Where as a diet with nine serves of vegetables a day is more likely to have a mix of microbes associated with better health outcomes.

I then created a diet for my brain, based on research, to provide what my brain needed and looked at implementing stress-reducing activities. The idea was to create a healthy environment for my brain and optimise the environmental factors that might work to help me achieve my greatest health.

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If you have MS, our nutrition protocol, may help you regain your strength

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